Songs with Earlier Histories Than the Hit Version

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Tagged: Dave Clark Five

Over and Over

First recorded (as a B-side) by Bobby Day (US #41/R&B #1 1958).
Also recorded by Thurston Harris (US #96 1958).
Other hit version by The Dave Clark Five (US #1/UK #45 1965).
Also recorded by The Righteous Brothers (1965).

From the wiki: “‘Over and Over’ was written by Robert James Byrd and was recorded by him in 1958 using his stage name, Bobby Day (a name he earlier used when a member of the original ‘Bob & Earl’ duo until parting ways in 1957). Day’s version entered the Billboard Hot 100 in 1958, first as the B-side to the hit single ‘Rockin’ Robin’ and, soon after, as an A-side, the same week a version of the same song by Thurston Harris (who had covered Day’s ‘Little Bitty Pretty One‘ the previous year with chart success) entered the chart. Day’s version would reach #41 on the Hot 100 but would top the R&B chart; Harris’ single peaked on the Hot 100 at #96.

I Like It Like That

First recorded by Chris Kenner (US #2/R&B #2 1961).
Also recorded by The Nashville Teens (1964).
Other hit version by The Dave Clark Five (US #7 1965).

From the wiki: “‘I Like It Like That’ was written by Chris Kenner (‘Land of 1000 Dances‘) and Allen Toussaint (‘Java‘, ‘Yes We Can Can‘), and first recorded by Kenner in 1961. In 1964, The Nashville Teens recorded the song as a B-side to their hit single ‘Tobacco Road‘. ‘I Like It Like That’ was later covered by The Dave Clark Five in 1965. The Bobbettes (‘Mr. Lee’) recorded an answer-song in 1961 to Kenner’s recording, titling it ‘I Don’t Like It Like That’.”

Do You Love Me

Originally recorded by The Contours (US #3/R&B #1 1962).
Hit versions by Brian Poole & The Tremeloes (UK #1 1963), The Dave Clark Five (US #11/UK #30 1964).
Also recorded by The Hollies (1964).

From the wiki: “Berry Gordy wrote ‘Do You Love Me’ with the intent that The Temptations, who had no Top 40 hits to their name yet, would record it. However, when Gordy wanted to locate the group and record the song, they were nowhere to be found (the Temptations had not been made aware of Gordy’s intentions, and had departed Motown’s recording studio that day for a local Detroit gospel music showcase).

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