Songs with Earlier Histories Than the Hit Version

Help support this site! Consider clicking an ad from time to time. Thanks!

 
« Go Back to Previous Page «  

Tagged: Donny & Marie

Young Love

Co-written and first recorded by Ric Cartey & the Jiva-Tones (1956).
Hit versions by Sonny James (US #4/C&W #1 1957), Tab Hunter (US #1 1957), The Crew Cuts (US #17 1957), Connie Smith & Nat Stuckey (C&W #20 1969), Donny Osmond (US #25/UK #1 1973).

From the wiki: “‘Young Love’ was written by Ric Cartey and Carole Joyner, and was first recorded by Ric Cartey & the Jiva-Tones in November, 1956. Cartey’s version never charted but better-known versions were released within a short time – by Sonny James (January 5, 1957), Tab Hunter (a January 19, 1957 release that did even better on the charts than James’) and The Crew-Cuts (January 26, 1957). James’ recording was produced in October 1956 at Bradley Studio in Nashville, Tennessee, with vocal backing provided by the Jordanaires, the Nashville-based vocal group most known for their work with Elvis Presley.

Make the World Go Away

First recorded by Timi Yuro (US #24/CAN #11 1963).
Other hit versions by Ray Price (C&W #1 1963), Eddy Arnold (US #6/C&W #1/MOR #1 1965), Donny & Marie Osmond (US#44/MOR #31/UK #18 1975).
Also recorded by Jim Reeves (1964).

From the wiki: “‘Make the World Go Away’ was composed by Hank Cochran (‘I Fall to Pieces’) and first recorded by Timi Yuro in June, 1963. It has become a Top 40 popular success three times: for Yuro (1963), for Eddy Arnold (1965), and for the brother-sister duo Donny & Marie Osmond (1975) and topped the Country Singles chart (Ray Price, 1963). ‘Make the World Go Away’ was also recorded in July, 1964 by Jim Reeves, at his last recording session before dying in a plane crash two weeks later, for what would become the album The Jim Reeves Way.

“For Price, ‘Make the World Go Away’ was one of his first songs to feature an orchestra and female chorus, a trend that he would continue with other songs like ‘For the Good Times’. Arnold’s production was similarly recorded, the so-called ‘Nashville Sound’, an early mixture of Pop with Country music, and became one of the most popular recordings of 1960s Country music and is generally considered to be Arnold’s best-known song.”

Deep Purple

First recorded (as an instrumental) by Paul Whiteman & His Concert Orchestra (1934).
First vocal recording by Larry Clinton & His Orchestra with Bea Wain (US #1 1939).
Other hit versions by Artie Shaw with Helen Forrest (US #17 1939), Billy Ward & His Dominoes (US #20/UK #30 1957), Nino Tempo & April Stevens (US #1/UK #17 1963), Donny & Marie Osmond (US #14/UK #25 1976).

From the wiki: “‘Deep Purple’ was the biggest hit written by pianist Peter DeRose, who broadcast, 1923 to 1939, with May Singhi as ‘The Sweethearts of the Air’ on the NBC radio network. ‘Deep Purple’ was first published in 1933 as a piano composition. The following year, Paul Whiteman had ‘Deep Purple’ scored for his suave orchestra that was ‘making a lady out of jazz’ and the song became so popular in sheet music sales that Mitchell Parish added lyrics in 1938.

I’m Leaving It (All) Up to You

Written and first recorded (as “Leavin’ It All Up to You”) by Don & Dewey (1957).
Hit versions by Dale & Grace (US #1 1963), Donny & Marie (US #4 1974).
Also recorded by Linda Ronstadt (1970).

From the wiki: “‘I’m Leaving It All Up to You’ was written and first recorded by the Rock ‘n’ roll and Doo-wop duo Don & Dewey in 1957. Don & Dewey were Don ‘Sugarcane’ Harris and Dewey Terry, both of Pasadena, California. Both Don and Dewey played guitar, with Dewey often doubling on keyboards. When not playing guitar or bass, Don occasionally played the electric violin, a skill for which he subsequently became well known under the name of ‘Sugarcane’ Harris. ‘Wrecking Crew’ drummer Earl Palmer played frequently on their sessions. (In 1970, Harris re-emerged from semi-retirement to a wider rock audience, playing violin on the Hot Rats solo album by Frank Zappa, with Captain Beefheart (vocals) on ‘Willie The Pimp’ and on the lengthy instrumental jam, ‘The Gumbo Variations’. Harris went on to play on many more solo Zappa, and The Mothers of Invention albums.

“Although Don & Dewey did not have any hits of their own, several of the songs that they wrote and/or recorded would appear on the charts later, performed by other artists. Most famously, ‘I’m Leaving It Up to You’ became a #1 hit for Dale & Grace in 1963. It was the #1 song when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, in November 1963. Dale & Grace were in Dallas on the day of the assassination and were scheduled to perform that night as part of Dick Clark’s ‘Caravan of Stars’ (with Bobby Rydell, Jimmy Clanton, and Brian Hyland), and just moments before the assassination had waved to the president’s passing motorcade from a vantage point near their hotel.”

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close