Songs with Earlier Histories Than the Hit Version

Help support this site! Consider clicking an ad from time to time. Thanks!

 
« Go Back to Previous Page «  

Tagged: The Orioles

Baby, Please Don’t Go

First recorded by Big Joe Williams’ Washboard Blues Singers (1935).
Also recorded by Muddy Waters (1953), Mose Allison (1960), Georgia Fame (1963).
Hit versions by The Orioles (R&B #8 1952), Them (US #102/UK #10 1964).

From the wiki: “‘Baby, Please Don’t Go’ is a Blues song which has been called ‘one of the most played, most arranged, and most rearranged pieces in Blues history’ by music historian Gerard Herzhaft. Delta Blues musician Big Joe Williams popularized it with several versions beginning in 1935. The song’s roots have been traced back to nineteenth-century slave songs, dealing with themes of bondage and imprisonment. In 1952, a Doo-wop version by The Orioles reached the R&B Top 10 (an early 45 rpm issue available only on red vinyl); Muddy Waters’ 1953 recording recast the song as an electric Chicago Blues ensemble piece, influencing many subsequent renditions.

“‘Baby, Please Don’t Go’ became a popular Rock song in 1964 when the Northern Irish group Them recorded it as one of their earliest single releases. (Several music writers have identified Jimmy Page, at that time a studio guitarist, as performing for the recording, although his exact contributions are unclear.) Them’s version was sparked by a 1963 live recording by Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames (issued on Rhythm And Blues at the Flamingo) who, in turn, were inspired by Mose Allison’s 1960 recording. ‘Baby, Please Don’t Go’ was released as Them’s second single in November 1964. Boosted by the B-side, ‘Gloria’, it became their first hit, reaching #10 on the UK Singles Chart. ‘Gloria’ would be released in the US as an A-side in 1965 and 1966, peaking at #93 & #71 respectively.”

Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me

First recorded by Noble & King (1951).
Hit versions by Karen Chandler (US #5 1952), Muriel Smith (UK #3 1953), Mel Carter (US #8/MOR #1 1965), Johnny & Jonie Mosby (C&W #38 1969), Gloria Estefan (UK #11/IRE #22 1994).
Also recorded by The Orioles (1953), Connie Francis (1959).

Noble & King (1951) [No video available]

From the wiki: “‘Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me’ was written by Harry Noble in 1952. It became a hit in three different decades and is considered a classic of the early Rock/Pop era. The Karen Chandler recording became a US Top 10 hit in 1952; as was often the case with songs of that era, a version was also separately recorded for the UK market – by British singer Muriel Smith – and it became a Top 5 hit in Britain in 1953.

C.C. Rider (See See Rider)

First recorded (as ‘See See Rider Blues’) by Ma Rainey (US #12 1925).
Popular versions by Wee Bea Booze (R&B #1 1943), Chuck Willis (US #12/R&B #1 1957), LaVern Baker (US #34/R&B #9 1963), Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels (US #10 1965), The Animals (US #10/CAN #1/AUS #8 1966).
Also recorded by The Orioles (1952), Elvis Presley (1970 |1973).

From the wiki: “The song is generally regarded as being traditional in origin. Ma Rainey’s version (recorded as ‘See See Rider Blues’) became popular during 1925, telling the story of an unfaithful lover, commonly called ‘easy riders’ (‘See See rider, see what you have done’), making a play on the word ‘see’ and the sound of ‘easy’. The song has since become one of the most famous of all Blues songs, with well over 100 versions.

Crying in the Chapel

First recorded by Darrell Glenn & The Rhythm Riders (US #6/C&W #4 1953).
Hit versions by The Orioles (US #11/R&B #1 1953), Rex Allen (US #8/C&W #4 1953), Ella Fitzgerald (US #15 1953), Art Lund (US #23 1953), June Valli (US #4 1953), Elvis Presley (1960 |US #3/MOR #1/UK #1 1965).
Also recorded (as “Selassie Is the Chapel”) by Bob Marley & The Wailers (1968).

From the wiki: “‘Crying in the Chapel’ was written by Artie Glenn for his son, Darrell, to sing. Darrell recorded it while still in high school in 1953, along with Artie’s band the Rhythm Riders, and the record went Top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song went on to become one of the most-covered of 1953, with additional charted versions recorded by The Orioles (‘C.C. Rider‘), Rex Allen, Ella Fitzgerald, Art Lund, and June Valli. (The Orioles’ recording would be used two decades later in the soundtrack of American Graffiti.)

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close