Songs with Earlier Histories Than the Hit Version

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Tagged: England Dan & John Ford Coley

Broken Hearted Me

First recorded by England Dan & John Ford Coley (1978).
Hit version by Anne Murray (US #12/C&W #1/CAN #15 1979).

From the wiki: “‘Broken Hearted Me’ is a song written by Randy Goodrum (‘You Needed Me’, ‘It’s Sad to Belong’), originally recorded by England Dan & John Ford Coley in 1978 and later covered by Anne Murray. ‘Broken Hearted Me’ was Murray’s fourth #1 single on the US Country chart, and seventh overall on the Billboard Hot 100.”

What’s Forever For

First recorded by England Dan & John Ford Coley (1978).
Hit version by Michael Martin Murphy (US #19/C&W #1/CAN #1 1982).

From the wiki: “‘What’s Forever For’ is a song written by Rafe VanHoy and first recorded by England Dan and John Ford Coley on their 1978 album Dr. Heckle & Mr. Jive. The song saw its biggest success when it was recorded by Country music artist Michael Martin Murphey. It was released in June 1982 as the third single from his album, Michael Martin Murphey.”

We’ll Never Have to Say Goodbye Again

Written and first recorded by Jeffrey Comanor (1975).
Also recorded by Deardorf & Joseph (1976).
Hit version by England Dan & John Ford Coley (US #9 1978).

From the wiki: “‘We’ll Never Have to Say Goodbye Again’ was written by Jeffrey Comanor, and was first recorded by him in 1975 for release on the album A Rumor In His Own Time. England Dan & John Ford Coley took the song into the US Top 10 in 1979 with a cover version (included on their album Some Things Don’t Come Easy). ‘England’ Dan Seals had become familiar with the song while working as a session guitarist on the 1976 recording by Deardorf & Joseph.”

Love is the Answer

Written by Todd Rundgren and first recorded by Utopia (1977).
Hit version by England Dan & John Ford Coley (US #10 1979).

From the wiki: “‘Love Is the Answer’ is a song written by Todd Rundgren for his band Utopia. It is the closing track on their 1977 album Oops! Wrong Planet.

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