Songs with Earlier Histories Than the Hit Version

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Tagged: The Valentinos

Harry Hippie

Written and first recorded by Jim Ford (1970).
Hit version by Bobby Womack (R&B #8 1973).

From the wiki: “‘Harry Hippie’ was written by Jim Ford for a self-titled album scheduled to be issued by Capitol in the fall of 1970. But, Ford had a falling out with the label and the album was shelved. The song was written by Ford as a dedication to Bobby Womack’s brother, bass guitarist Harry Womack. ‘Harry Hippie’ would, after Womack recorded it in 1973, become a Top-10 R&B hit for Womack. According to Womack:

Harry was the bass player and tenor for the brothers when we were The Valentinos (‘It’s All Over Now‘). He lived a very carefree life. As a child he always said he wanted to live on an Indian reservation. We used to joke about it, but when we got older he was the same way. He always thought I wanted the materialistic things and I said, ‘I just want to do my music. My music put me into that comfortable territory.’ He didn’t want the pressure. We used to laugh and joke about the song when I’d sing it.”

It’s All Over Now

Written and first recorded by The Valentinos (US #94/R&B #21 1964).
Other hit version by The Rolling Stones (US #26/UK #1/IRE #2/NZ #2 1964).

From the wiki: “‘It’s All Over Now’ was written by Bobby Womack and Shirley Womack. It was first released by The Valentinos featuring Bobby Womack. The Valentinos version entered the Billboard Hot 100 on June 27, 1964, where it stayed on the chart for two weeks, peaking at #94.

“New York disc jockey Murray the K gave The Stones a copy of The Valentinos’ version and suggested they record it. The Stones recorded this during their first US tour at Chess Studios in Chicago, at a session that also produced ‘Time Is On My Side‘. ‘It’s All Over Now’ became the group’s first UK #1 hit, in July 1964. It was the band’s third single released in America, and stayed in the Billboard Hot 100 for ten weeks, peaking at #26.

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